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Dec 14
2018

Posted by: Jim Lillie

Multitools for 2018

Jim Lillie
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Multitools for 2018

While many people would be content to tote along a standard Swiss Army Knife as sensible preparation for whatever little aggravations life might present in the form of interesting and hard-to-reach fixes, truth is that even the most tricked out version can't hope to address every conceivable project need and still fit into a coat or trouser pocket.

Herewith, then, some of the more inventive multi-tools of 2018, some available now while other require pre-order:

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Dec 13
2018

Posted by: Stephanie Faris

Growing Problem of Substance-Related Hospital Admissions in the Elderly Concerns Experts

Stephanie Faris
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Growing Problem of Substance-Related Hospital Admissions in the Elderly Concerns Experts

They came of age during the 60s and 70s, when flower power and hippie culture dominated. Recreational drug use was a part of that era, with amphetamines, LSD, and marijuana being particularly popular. But with that generation now reaching retirement age, the medical community is seeing a disturbing trend. Baby boomers are increasingly visiting medical facilities with drug-related mental health issues.

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Dec 12
2018

Posted by: Jim Lillie

Japanese Man Marries Hologram

Jim Lillie
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Japanese Man Marries Hologram

For Akihiko Kondo, his virtual matrimony may well prove worth the $18,000 USD price tag. Especially since any in-laws would, in theory, need to originate from the same disembodied source.

His lovely bride: A 16-year-old cartoon character called Hatsune Miku, a hologram who takes advantage of a voice synthesizer to treat sold-out audiences to her talents all over the world. Just the kind of girl every 35-year-old man wants to bring home to Mom.

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Dec 11
2018

Posted by: Stephanie Faris

Australian Scientist Discovers New Part of Brain

Stephanie Faris
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Australian Scientist Discovers New Part of Brain

Just when you thought we’d learned all we could possibly know about the human brain, scientists unearth a new section that was previously unknown. The researcher behind a new discovery had actually suspected there was an undiscovered area of the brain for decades, but he recently turned his suspicion into reality.

Neuroscience Research Australia’s Professor George Paxinos gave the newly-discovered area a name: Endorestiform Nucleus. He detailed what he’d learned about Endorestiform Nucleus in a new book called Human Brainstem: Cytoarchitecture, Chemoarchitecture, Myeloarchitecture. The professor says the new region is located in the area where the cerebellum connects to the underlying brain stem. That region is responsible for connecting spatial and motor information in order to regulate fine motor skills.

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Dec 10
2018

Posted by: Jim Lillie

Too-Close Encounters with the Outside World

Jim Lillie
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Too-Close Encounters with the Outside World

The tribe believed to have killed a 26-year-old American missionary who illegally accessed their protected island has in the past experienced 11 other encounters with the outside world.

Some of those visits to the Sentinelese, an indigenous people who live on India's North Sentinel Island several hundred miles from the mainland, came from anthropologists visiting in the 1960s. Other contacts date to the 1800s.

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Dec 09
2018

Posted by: Stephanie Faris

New Medical Superglue Could Heal Joint Injuries Faster

Stephanie Faris
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New Medical Superglue Could Heal Joint Injuries Faster

Nothing can hamper an athlete’s progress like a joint injury. But a new type of medical superglue could keep them moving forward. The glue could help active injury sufferers skip invasive surgeries and get back to their active lifestyles much more quickly. The material is 90 percent water, with the ability to naturally attach to soft tissue.

Often when an injury occurs, surgeons discover holes in the cartilage, which requires inserting a scaffold. Attaching that type of material usually requires stitches, which makes the surgery more invasive than it would have been otherwise, since the stitches themselves bring further damage to the very area they’re designed to repair.

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Dec 08
2018

Posted by: Jim Lillie

Overcoming ‘Runner’s Boob’

Jim Lillie
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Overcoming Runners Boob

Breasts, it turns out, can move about 15 centimeters during a run. That's quite a bit of movement, particularly for the more generously endowed.

So, what to do about the phenomenon known as "runner's boob"?

Rose George, writing at the Guardian newspaper of London, attributes at least part of the problem to women who regard crop-top outfits as though they were a substitute for a sturdy bra. And so, she says she's tempted to say out loud when she sees such a woman on a run, "For God's sake, get a better sports bra."

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