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Oct 11
2009

Posted by: Sim Dhillon

Capitalistic Anthropocentrism: Leading Cause of Biodiversity Loss?

Sim Dhillon
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Capitalistic Anthropocentrism: Leading Cause of Biodiversity Loss?

Simi Dhillon

An anthropocentric (“human-centered”) view of nature, arguably a result of a capitalistic ideology (or vice versa),  refers to the relationship between humans and animals, particularly a relationship in which animals and plants are valuable only to the extent to which they can be used and exploited by humans for humans in a capitalist system. This view sees nature as an instrument, rather than having any intrinsic value. The anthropocentric view of nature would suggest not only that nature is distinct from (and an instrument for) humans, but also that humans are individually-defined, autonomous creatures that selfishly pursue only their own needs and wants. Therefore, the suggestion is that humans too are distinct from and instrumentally used by other humans. In lieu of this idea, during the last century, erosion of biodiversity and species extinction has been increasingly observed due to human activities, in particular, destruction of plant and animal habitats. Almost all scientists acknowledge that the rate of species loss is greater now than at any time in human history, with extinctions occurring at rates hundreds of times higher than background extinction rates, as an estimated one of eight known plant species and a potential 140,000 species per year are threatened with extinction (Pimm, et al). Elevated rates of extinction are being driven by anthropocentric, capitalistic human consumption of organic resources, deforestation to clear land for housing development and agricultural and commercial use, and oil pollution representative of material waste; consequently, a move toward an eco-centric view of life other than human should be a human priority.  

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Oct 09
2009

Posted by: Elisha Leo

Beds with Concepts

Elisha Leo
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Having trouble sleeping lately, I have a strange interest in beds. Here are some unique beds ;-) with unique designs. Functional? Innovative? Take a look at them :

1. Not sure how to name this one.

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Oct 07
2009

Posted by: Elisha Leo

7.6 Earthquake struck Padang, thousands were killed

Elisha Leo
Tagged in: tsunami , padang , news , indonesia , earthquake , death , beach

I took a flight to  Medan, North Sumatra weeks ago. It's a small town near Lake Toba, the lake that surrounds an island in the middle.

 

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Oct 05
2009

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My Dragon Breath and the power of Tic Tac's

 


Dragon Breath !

Being born the year of the dragon is just one of the many blessings I have received in life. Along with being a DRAGON sometimes you find your self with Dragon Breath.  Dragon breath is the polite way of saying that your breath is not as fresh as others (my wife) would like. Growing up in an Indian Home and eating Indian foods your palette is introduced to a wide array of spices and vegetables, almost all Indian food use’s a super size of Onions & Garlic as a combo it’s enough to keep any vampire away.


Onion Garlic and Curry Oh My. 



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Oct 02
2009

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Return of spandex. Lulu Lemon and men in tights.

For the last while I have been wanting a track suit for chilaxing in the house  and on weekends and I have been bothering my wife to get me one. Usually when I want to buy some athletic sports wear I would step off to sports stores like Foot locker, Sports Chek, & National Sports.

But this time I was in for a surprise my wife came home with SPANDEX pants from a store called LuLu Lemon. 

                   

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Sep 29
2009

Posted by: Sim Dhillon

Larceny: A Radical Analysis

Sim Dhillon
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Larceny: A Radical Analysis

Simi Dhillon

            Society is an ever-changing ideological structure that is continually constructed and reconstructed through attempts to maintain and challenge existing forms of power relationships, namely that of the minority of those who control the means of production (the Bourgeoisie—upper class) and the majority of those who do not (the Proletariat—working class). Essentially, society is perpetuated by fundamental inequalities and conflicts of interest, as well as class struggles and conflicting ideologies, the more dominant of which is defined by the Bourgeoisie. Inevitably, social relationships are the basis upon which the production of the basic means of human existence is held. Accordingly, wealth is created by the Proletariat and discreetly appropriated in the form of profits by the Bourgeoisie. Perhaps the most obvious questions raised by the dynamics of society are why do the Proletariat tolerate such conditions and how does society not detonate into civil war? The answer lies in the idea that the Bourgeoisie, in some surreptitious manner, manipulate the Proletariat’s perception of the social world and falsely convince them to believe that the economic system is based upon freedom, fairness, and equality—essentially democratic ideals. It can be deduced, therefore, that the ideology of the ruling class is the primary influence on politics, and consequently on such areas of study as crime and deviance.

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Sep 29
2009

Posted by: Sim Dhillon

Born American and Confused

Sim Dhillon
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Born American and Confused

Simi Dhillon

            For hundreds of years, Indians have immigrated to virtually every continent of the world for various reasons. The earliest Indian immigrants arrived in the United States in the early 1900s as less educated farmers and laborers. However, the vast majority of recent Indian immigrants have arrived since more reformed immigration acts have been passed. These immigrants, in contrast to earlier immigrants, are college-educated, middle class professionals. Although many are forced to assimilate into American culture, they hold fast to their traditions with great pride. But, what drove these foreigners from their homeland to locations more than 20,000 miles away? How were they received by the American population upon arrival? How does being a minority group affect family dynamics within the average immigrant family? How do American-born children of immigrant parents deal with the pressures of being bi-cultural? The answers to such questions are evident in the history of Indian immigration to the United States, as well as in the study of bi-cultural adolescents.

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